Uma Thurman reveals she was a victim of Harvey Weinstein’s sexual molestation

Uma Thurman has made a shocking revelation about her experience with Harvey Weinstein, the alleged sexual predator who prowled in Hollywood for years, shamelessly and fearlessly devouring women and leaving trails of pain and lifetime nightmares in their souls.

During her interview with the New York Times, Thurman showed great strength and courage, an act which has been embraced by dozens of women around the world.

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Image: Uma Thurman

The Pulp Fiction actress did not only uncover details of the alleged sexual assault from Weinstein, she fulfilled her earlier promise to leave nothing behind during the long-awaited tell-all tale by pointing fingers at her former agency CAA of being “connected to Weinstein’s predatory behavior.”

Although she did not go further in the second part of her speech, Thurman did say that Quentin Tarantino could have done more to protect her from an accident during the making of Kill Bill, after she was forced to drive a car on a sandy twisty road for a scene.

To buttress her point on Quentin’s carelessness, the 47-year-old gave Maureen Dowd (NY Times representative) a footage of the crash.

 

In the article which was posted 3 February and released on today’s print edition, Thurman described being assaulted by an unnamed actor 20 years older than her when she was 16, and she not only details Weinstein’s sexual misconducts toward her, but her lingering memory of staying silent for so long.

It could be said that the Massachusetts-born actress could have come forward with these claims many years ago to save other women from the pains and agony. She understood and bemoaned her inability to make it public, noting that the daunting trauma has always been there.

“The complicated feeling I have about Harvey is how bad I feel about all the women that were attacked after I was,” Thurman said. “I am one of the reasons that a young girl would walk into his room alone, the way I did.”

She continued in her discussions with Dowd. “Quentin used Harvey as the executive producer of ‘Kill Bill,’ a movie that symbolizes female empowerment, and all these lambs walked into slaughter because they were convinced nobody rises to such a position who would do something illegal to you, but they do.”

Weinstein has long denied all allegations from his victims. He claims none of the women were raped, adding that all sex encounters were consensual.

Here’s a snippet of the article:

The first “attack,” she says, came not long after in Weinstein’s suite at the Savoy Hotel in London.

“It was such a bat to the head. He pushed me down. He tried to shove himself on me. He tried to expose himself. He did all kinds of unpleasant things. But he didn’t actually put his back into it and force me. You’re like an animal wriggling away, like a lizard. I was doing anything I could to get the train back on the track. My track. Not his track.”

She was staying in Fulham with her friend, Ilona Herman, Robert De Niro’s longtime makeup artist, who later worked with Thurman on “Kill Bill.”

“The next day to her house arrived a 26-inch-wide vulgar bunch of roses,” Thurman says. “They were yellow. And I opened the note like it was a soiled diaper and it just said, ‘You have great instincts.’” Then, she says, Weinstein’s assistants started calling again to talk about projects.

She thought she could confront him and clear it up, but she took Herman with her and asked Weinstein to meet her in the Savoy bar. The assistants had their own special choreography to lure actresses into the spider’s web and they pressured Thurman, putting Weinstein on the phone to again say it was a misunderstanding and “we have so many projects together.”

Finally she agreed to go upstairs, while Herman waited on a settee outside the elevators.

Once the assistants vanished, Thurman says, she warned Weinstein, “If you do what you did to me to other people you will lose your career, your reputation and your family, I promise you.” Her memory of the incident abruptly stops there.

Through a representative, Weinstein, who is in therapy in Arizona, agreed that “she very well could have said this.”

Downstairs, Herman was getting nervous. “It seemed to take forever,” the friend said.

Finally, the elevator doors opened and Thurman walked out. “She was very disheveled and so upset and had this blank look,” Herman recalled.

“Her eyes were crazy and she was totally out of control. I shoveled her into the taxi and we went home to my house. She was really shaking.” Herman said that when the actress was able to talk again, she revealed that Weinstein had threatened to derail her career.