Travis Scott previously pleaded guilty to concert-related accidents in 2015 and 2017

Well before the deadly chaos at his Astroworld music festival, Travis Scott had pleaded guilty to criminal charges related to two concerts where authorities said the rapper encouraged fans to rush the stage.

Travis Scott and Kylie Jenner
Travis Scott and Kylie Jenner

Eight people died and hundreds more were injured at Scott’s music festival in Houston on Friday after the crowd of around 50,000 people surged forward while he was performing.

Videos from the festival showed concertgoers screaming for help and asking venue workers to stop the show as Scott continued with his set. Houston Fire Chief Samuel Peña said on NBC’s”Today” that Scott should have stopped the concert if he could tell that there were problems in the crowd.

Scott previously took a plea deal after being arrested on suspicion of inciting a riot at a Bentonville, Arkansas concert in 2017, KFSM reported

Police accused Scott of encouraging people at the concert to bypass security protocols and rush to the stage, causing several people to be injured, according to KFSM. In Arkansas, a charge of inciting a riot becomes a felony if someone is injured.

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As part of the deal, Scott pleaded guilty to disorderly conduct instead and paid a $7,465.31 fine, KFSM reported. 

The rapper was also arrested and charged with disorderly conduct in relation to a performance at Lollapalooza in Chicago in 2015, WLS reported.

Police said Scott encouraged fans to climb over security barricades, ignore security workers, and rush the stage at the concert, according to the report. Security quickly got the situation under control and no fans were injured at the event, but organizers told WLS that Scott could have created a dangerous situation.

The Chicago Office of Emergency Management said Scott “fled the scene” after performing only one song and was arrested shortly after, WLS reported. 

Scott later pleaded guilty to reckless conduct charges related to the incident, and a judge ordered him to remain under court supervision for a year, according to Rolling Stone.