Report claims China has missiles and electronics to invade Taiwan

A report issued by the Taiwanese defense ministry claims China’s armed forces can “paralyze” Taiwan’s defenses and are able to fully monitor Taiwan army deployments.

US-Taiwan relations

Beijing has recently increased military activities around the island, which it described as Chinese territory. Further, China has always been clear that it would retake Taiwan with force.

In this year’s annual report to parliament on the state of China’s military, Taiwan’s Defense Ministry presented a more stark view than last year, when the report said China was not yet prepared to invade Taiwan.

The new Taiwanese report said that China could conduct what it termed “soft and hard electronic attacks”, including blocking communications across the western part of the first island chain, the string of islands that run from the Japanese archipelago, through Taiwan and down to the Philippines.

China “can combine with its internet army to launch wired and wireless attacks against the global internet, which would initially paralyze our air defenses, command of the sea and counter-attack system abilities, presenting a huge threat to us”, noted the report.

China has also developed its own GPS system, allowing it to improve its reconnaissance abilities, the ministry added.

Using its own GPS, Beijing could monitor movements around Taiwan, helped by China’s regular use of its own spy planes, drones and intelligence gathering chips, it said.

Of note, this year’s report, like last year, said China still lacks transport abilities and logistical support for a large-scale invasion. Still, the Taiwanese said the Chinese military is working to boost those capabilities.

Taiwan also warned that with its precision missiles, the Chinese can strike anywhere on the island, and is capable of “paralyzing” Taiwan military command centers and the combat capacity of its naval and air forces.

Further, the Taiwanese said, with the deployment of mid- and long-range missiles and more exercises involving its aircraft carriers, China is trying to be in place, to delay “foreign military intervention” in an attack on Taiwan, the ministry said.

President Tsai Ing-wen has made expanding Taiwan’s defenses a priority, increasing the ability of its domestic defense industry and buying more equipment from the United States, the island’s chief arms supplier and international backer.