Bundesliga International CEO says German football league is a role model

The CEO of Bundesliga International Robert Klein called the German league a trendsetter in European football after RB Leipzig and Bayern Munich reached the final four of the 2019-20 Champions League, with the Bavarians winning this season’s treble.

German football can be a role model in several ways, Klein said in a recent interview.

The fact that three German coaches made it to the Champions League semifinals tells the story of a successful coaching education system, he underlined.

Manuel Neuer (C), captain of FC Bayern Munich lifts the UEFA Champions League trophy following his team’s victory in the UEFA Champions League Final match between Paris Saint-Germain and Bayern Munich at Estadio do Sport Lisboa e Benfica in Lisbon, Portugal, Aug. 23, 2020. (Photo by Julian Finney/UEFA via Xinhua)

“Germany has been the first nation to have three of its coaches among the final four in the Champions League,” he added.

The reasons seem apparent in Klein’s view.

To coach in Germany’s top three leagues, one must obtain a football coaching licence, and the country has a strict and selective education system, he explained: “Each year, only 24 or 25 applicants are accepted at the only education venue, the Hennes-Weisweiler Academy in Cologne.”

The academy, named after one of the country’s most famous coaches, is solely responsible for the highest available coaching license.

The success of clubs and coaches strengthens the Bundesliga’s position in European football, against the English Premier League, Spain’s La Liga, the Italian Serie A, and France’s Ligue 1.

Looking at the big five European leagues, the Bundesliga is the one with the most goals per game.

Bayern’s success also proves football clubs can succeed at the highest level and follow reasonable financial procedures.

Klein called safeguarding the club’s financial pattern more important than ever for the future of football.

Germany has been on the right track over the last decades, keeping an eye on its clubs’ financial policy. The COVID-19 pandemic might have enforced the impression.

Bayern remains the league’s flagship from an international perspective, the official underlined.

Despite the Bavarians having dominated the national and international stage, close competition is secured as domestic competitors such as RB Leipzig, Borussia Monchengladbach, Bayer Leverkusen and Borussia Dortmund have caught up over recent years.

The 2020/2021 season will provide thrilling games for fans as the leading clubs are close together. “We had only four points between the top three before the pandemic outbreak.”

The pandemic forced clubs to develop creative concepts to stay in close contact with fans and partners worldwide. “Virtual tours run by several clubs have been a great success,” he added.

Klein is expecting the many young talents to continue their performance. He mentioned Dortmund’s Erling Haaland as one of the examples next to Jadon Sancho.

Chinese fans are fond of the football played by German clubs, he said. “The Bundesliga is big in China,” Klein commented.

The league association is happy about setting up concepts, allowing a certain number of fans to return to stadiums using a day-to-day approach considering infection numbers.

The safety and health of fans, players, and staff remains the primary target, Klein said. Depending on local figures, Leipzig set up a concept to allow 8,500 fans to see their first home game against FSV Mainz 05 on Sept. 20.

Other clubs are expected to follow.

Concepts base on the league’s general concept, leading to the earliest re-start of all European leagues.

The Bundesliga is also going to intensify its efforts to support football development in China.

German clubs are increasing their effort to find Chinese talents for their squads. “We know there are a lot of talented players in China and I believe we will have Chinese players in the Bundesliga in the foreseeable future,” Klein added.